Family: Hesperiidae

Lesser dart (Potanthus omaha) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated or Palm dart (Telicota ancilla) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated

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Family: Lycaenidae

Yamfly (loxura atymnus fuconius) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated

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Family: Pieridae

Chocolate grass yellow (Eurema Sari Sodalis) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated

Chocolate grass yellow (Eurema Sari Sodalis)

***Further research is required***


Family: Pieridae

Mottled emigrant (catopsilia pyranthe pyranthe) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated

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Family: Papilionidae

Blue Jay (Graphium evemon) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated

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Family: Papilionidae

Tailed Jay (graphium agamemnon agamemnon) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated

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Family: Papilionidae

Common Bluebottle (Graphium sarpedon luctatius) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated
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Family: Papilionidae

Common Mormon (Papilio polytes) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated
Common Mormon(Papilio polystes) female;form stichius
Stichius form (Picture taken by Stephanie Young)

A species of swallowtail known for the Batesian mimicry displayed by the numerous forms of its females which mimic inedible red-bodied swallowtails, such as the common rose and crimson rose. But they not only mimic colours and patterns of inedible butterflies but their flight patterns as well. the design of their eyes allow them to see in many directions simultaneously. Common mormon butterflies are important for the ecosystem as pollinators, herbivores, and prey. The female of this species has 3 different colour and pattern formations which help it to disguise it’s self as an inedible species.


Family: Papilionidae

Emerald Swallowtail (Papilio palinurus) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated

emerald

 


Family: Papilionidae

Great Mormon (Papilio memnon) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated
Great Mormon (Papilio memnon) female
Great Mormon female
Great Mormon (Papilio memnon) male
Great Mormon male

This species of butterfly also has Batesian mimicry (mimic the form or colour of an inedible species). The male has 4 different colour forms and the female has at least 26 different forms. They feed primarily of plants that provide citrus fruits supporting the pollination of citrus plants many of which are cultivated by humans for many different  industries.


Family: Nymphalidae

Common Palmfly (Elymnias hypermnestra) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated
Common Palmfly (Elymnias hypermnestra)
Common Palmfly male

This species is distinguished by the spot on it’s lower wing as they vary is colour between sub-species. They are responsible for pollinating coconut palms among other which produce fruit and species of rattan which are used to make furniture. This feeding behaviour provides a food source for many species on the island including humans, supporting the higher trophic level species.


Family: Nymphalidae

Danaine butterfly (Euploea camaralzeman) IUCN REDLIST:Not Evaluated
Euploea camaralzeman camaralzeman female
Picture taken by Sofie Pourchaire

The species are also known as milkweed butterflies after the particular types of plant they lay their eggs on and feed off of. Milkweeds are full of toxins which the butterfly absorbs when a larvae and when it metamorphosis’s the toxins are transferred into their wings making them distasteful to their predators.


Family: Nymphalidae

Knight (Lebadea martha) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated

Knight butterfly

***further research required***


Family: Lycaenidae

Oakblue (Arhopala sp) IUCN REDLIST:Not Evaluated

Oakblue(Arhopala sp.)Family Lycaenidae

***Further research required***


Family: Papilionidae

Noble’s Helen (Papilio noblei) IUCN REDLIST:Not Evaluated

Papilio.nobelei

This species of butterfly is commonly found around Asia, however local entomologists have not been able to find this species in the southern parts of Cambodia. This record is the first. The pollinate citrus plants and other that are used in traditional medicines for fever and also some plants are used in traditional cuisines. Their larval stage resembles bird dropping to escape predation as these butterflies are edible. The adult usually mimic other inedible species as a form of predatory evasion.


Family: Nymphalidae

White edge blue baron (Euthalia phemius) IUCN REDLIST:Not Evaluated
P1020266 - Copy
Male and female copulating

***Further research required***

White-edged Blue Baron(Euthalia phemius)male;Family Nymphalidae 2
white edge blue baron

 


Moths

Family: Geometridae

Yellow moth (Dysphania sagana) IUCN REDLIST: Note Evaluated

Dysphania subrepleta

***Further research required***


Family: Erebidae

Fruit piercing moth (Eudocima materna) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated

Fruit piercing moth (Eudocima sp)

***Further research required***


Family: Sphingidae

Mango hawk moth (Amplypterus Panopus) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated

Mango hawk moth (Amplypterus Panopus)

***Further research required***


In this link you will find information about the importance of butterflies and other pollinators insects as well as information about their metamorphosis

butterfly-metaphosis

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