Here are some of the snake species we have documented and identified so far on the island. If you click on the picture you can learn all about them and why they are important to the islands ecosystem and us.

Cat snakes

Family: Colubridae

Green cat snake (Boiga cyanea) IUCN REDLIST: Not evaluated

green cat snake (3)

Green cat snakes are another member of the colubrid family. They feed on small reptiles, amphibians, birds and rodents as well as other snakes. They are mildly venomous and can paralyze small animals but are not considered dangerous to humans as they are not aggressive.


Rat snakes

Family: Colubridae

Indo-chinese rat snake (Ptyas korros) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated

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The indo-chinese rat snake is part of the colubrid family and endemis to SE Asia. This species primarily feeds on rodents (great for people) and other small vertebrates. They are active during the day and are not dangerous to humans, they would prefer to flee but will strike if cornered. They vary in colour from silver, grey, brown and orange and are regularly seen around the island.


Keelback

Family: Colubridae

Yellow Spotted Keelback (Xenochrophis flavipunctatus)  IUCN REDLIST: Least Concern

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The Yellow Spotted Keelback is a diurnal snake so it usually comes out during the day. Generally they are not aggressive towards humans because we are too large to consume. However care should always be taken when in the presence of any snake species. Sometimes this specie will swallow it’s prey whole whilst it’s still alive. Thank goodness we are too big!


Kraits

Family: Elapidae

Malayan krait (Bungarus candidus) IUCN REDLIST: Least Concern

Malayan krait (1)

Malayan kraits are a species of elapid which are a family of venomous snakes. They feed primarily on other snakes but will hunt other small animals. These snakes are extremely toxic and it is NOT advised to touch one, but they are active at night and shy creatures so the likelihood to seeing one is very remote.

 

 


Pit viper

Family: Viperidae

Russel’s viper (Daboia russelii) IUCN REDLIST: Least Concern

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The Russel’s viper is one of the larger species in this family. Like most vipers it is an ambush predator laying in wait for prey to come by when they will strike. This is a venomous snake however to be bitten by one you would have to walk into the jungle off the beaten track to find one on the island.

 

 


Vogel’s green pit viper (Trimeresurus vogeli) IUCN REDLIST: Least Concern

pit viper ........... unknown

The Vogel’s pit viper is venomous and dangerous as this specie as they are ambush predators that attract their prey while they hide beneath leaf litter. You are unlikely to find one unless you trail off the path. The interesting thing about the specimen we have documented it the bright ruby coloured eyes. This does not seem to be a regular occurrence in this specie.


Pythons

Family: Pythonidae

Reticulated python (Python reticulatus) IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated

Reticulated python (Python reticulatus) photographerGil Koren

 

 

Reticulated pythons are the world’s longest snakes (among the 3 heaviest of the snake species) and reptile. Like all pythons, they are nonvenomous because they constrict their prey and normally are not considered dangerous to humans.

 

 


Tree snakes

Family: Colubridae

Golden tree snake (Chrysopelea ornata)IUCN REDLIST: Not Evaluated

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Golden tree snakes are a member of the colubrid family but these snakes are also known as gliders. They flatten their bodies and can glide up to 100m from the top of a tree. They feed during the day on lizards, bats and small rodents. They are not considered dangerous to humans as their venom is too weak.


Paradise tree snake (Chrysopelea paradisi)IUCN REDLIST: Least Concern

paradise tree snake

Paradise tree snakes are distinguished from golden tree snakes by the yellow/ red flower pattern along their backs. They are also gliders but as smaller in size compared to the golden tree snake. Also venomous but not considered dangerous to humans as their venom is too weak.


Vine snakes

Family: Lamprophiidae

Asian Vine snake (Ahaetulla prasina)IUCN REDLIST: Least Concern

Asoan vine snake (Ahaetulla prasina) (11)

 

Asian vine snakes are a species from the colubrid family; one of  the largest snake families and include about two-thirds of all known living snake species. They are mildly venomous but feed on amphibians and lizards, so rarely cause harm to humans.

 



***Identification of these species has been made through, photographic documentation cross referenced with external specialists and identification books. Any errors in our database will be rectified upon notification, if you feel that we have misidentified any species please help us to improve our research through our contact us page. All people involved will be acknowledge in the website and reports***

If you have any pictures or information from or about the island please help us to improve our database by sending your information through to us via our contact page



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